Category Archives: Uncategorized

Anger: an emotion much devalued

ramblinginthecity:

Are you angry? Good! An excellent essay on why anger as a fuel for change is something we need to think about and learn to harness…

Originally posted on Ramblings of a Sanky Maniac:

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I woke up this morning to this message posted by a lovely well meaning lady and to thoughts of how this amazing emotion – a fuel of our civilisation carries the burden of so much negativism and is so utterly devalued.

At one point of time, when my ‘change the world’ rhetoric was still very much confined to the armchair, I remember having a chat with an anarchist activist friend of mine, yes one of those hardcore ones, as to why solutions are being sought in anger. He was at that time participating in a sit down movement with squatter settlement owners in Jo’berg protesting their eviction from their homes. His immediate comment was laughter… At me and my misguided ideology of comfort. He was not kind in his words, he never is, and told me to understand that such armchair rhetoric comes from levels off comfort not accessible to…

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How to deal with problems by burying your head in the sand

ramblinginthecity:

Sharp, insightful and making a strong case for a legal approach to prostitution, as opposed to one that is based on moralistic judgement. Coming from a lady who walks the talk by actively working with trafficked and abused women and children. Kudos, Monolita!

Originally posted on Ramblings of a Sanky Maniac:

I woke up this morning to what i initially thought was a very interesting piece in the Hindu Op Ed section:

The dark side of pleasure: http://m.thehindu.com/opinion/op-ed/the-dark-side-of-pleasure/article7519141.ece

But as I read through it, I sadly realises it is another typical missing the wood for the forest kind of knee jerk reaction article, which chooses to ignore the real problems in bleeding heart arm chair activism. I feel especially sad when I see it coming from well meaning and obviously highly emancipated women. Sitting a couple of pages after the news of how an enquiry is being conducted in the raids conducted in Mumbai hotels where couples were booked under the public indecency act, in itself an idiotic Victorian rule, such an article coming from an emminent scholar need to be looked at through many perspectives.

Firstly lets look at the concept of pornography. Pornography is nothing but an extension of…

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The life and times of a b**g*r

ramblinginthecity:

Of all Udai’s writings, I’ve enjoyed this the most. He really wanted to write about b**g*rs!!

Originally posted on theamazingud:

I was born in somebody’s nostrils. A dark, damp place filled with our homes. When I slept I dreamt of light. I thought that my home was peaceful and I would live forever in this place.

But the next day I saw the monstrous thing. It picked up my brother. ‘It’s going to eat him up’, I thought. It flicked my brother on to the carpet. ‘How rude!’ I thought. I found that this monstrous thing or ‘the finger’ won’t leave us alone.

One day I woke up to find myself in the gutter. I stayed there for weeks and weeks. I was saved by water missiles that poured down from the skies. Next day ice and water missiles rained from the skies. I saw a massive strangely shaped giant running. Those missiles must be deadly for him to be in such a hurry.

After some months, the…

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My Ramzan food journey to Matiah Mahal, Jama Masjid

ramblinginthecity:

Udai pens down his recent gastronomical journey to Matia Mahal during Ramzan…. Enjoy and yes, your mouth will water!

Originally posted on theamazingud:

Ramzan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. In this month, every able-bodied man, woman and teenager is supposed to fast. From dawn to sunset nothing is allowed to touch their tongues. After seeing the moon and doing Namaz they can eat whatever they want till sunrise.

A few weeks ago, I went to Old Delhi to try all the various delicacies made during Ramzan. I went by metro with my father’s friend Ruzeveh. The metro was very, very crowded. My father was waiting for me when I got to the Chowri Bazaar metro station. We walked till Jama Masjid and after some time entered Matiah Mahal.

We had seekh kebabs and beef boti at Lalu Kebabee; brain curry, tandoori roti and Nihari at Haji Shabrati; biryani at Tofiq Biryani; mango ice-cream, and kesar milk and Firni  at a shop opposite Karim’s. We drank lassi at Khabo Lassi too. I liked…

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Changing gears: Can the open defecation conversation move beyond subliminal patriarchal messaging?

ramblinginthecity:

My co-authored post with Kimberly Noronha on how we need to talk about the ‘real’ stuff when it comes to toilets and open defecation! being stuck at women’s honour has worked only in conjunction with ground level effort. It’s time to change the conversation

Originally posted on cprurban:

By Mukta Naik and Kimberly Noronha, both Senior Researchers at CPR

In today’s fast paced, slogan-driven policy environment, the pressure by the political masters (and indeed, the polity) on the bureaucracy to deliver on promises is enormous. The Prime Minister’s declaration of a “Swachh Bharat” by October 2019, complete with the status of an Open-Defecation Free (ODF) India is a commendable goal. But in a scenario of tight deadlines, the temptation is to pluck low hanging fruit, which in this case is women’s dignity and honour.

niti ayog Photo: Creative Commons License

We live in a patriarchal society; we don’t have to like it, but that is a fact. Patriarchal values are structured around women’s position and identity in society relative to men – largely linked to control over women’s sexuality. The protection of women’s dignity is linked to the honour of the household in particular, and the community at large under…

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To localise and humanise India’s urban project

ramblinginthecity:

Hard hitting!

Originally posted on Resources Research:

Cities and towns have outdated and inadequate master plans that are unable to address the needs of inhabitants. Photo: Rahul Goswami (2013) Cities and towns have outdated and inadequate master plans that are unable to address the needs of inhabitants. Photo: Rahul Goswami (2013)

The occasional journal Agenda (published by the Centre for Communication and Development Studies) has focused on the subject of urban poverty. A collection of articles brings out the connections between population growth, the governance of cities and urban areas, the sub-populations of the ‘poor’ and how they are identified, the responses of the state to urbanisation and urban residents (links at the end of this post).

My contribution to this issue has described how the urbanisation of India project is being executed in the name of the ‘urban poor’. But the urban poor themselves are lost in the debate over methodologies to identify and classify them and the thicket of entitlements, provisions and agencies to facilitate their ‘inclusion’ and ‘empowerment’. I have divided my essay into…

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The Story of Tommorowland (spoiler alert)

ramblinginthecity:

What started as a review but ended up more like a narration….

Originally posted on theamazingud:

If you want to watch the movie, this gives away the story.

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The story starts with a young boy named Frank Walker, at a fair trying to win $50 by making a jet pack. The jet pack doesn’t work as well as he wants it to. There he meets a girl named Athena who gives him a pin and asks him to follow her, but to do it discreetly. He eventually reaches a futuristic place named Tommorowland. Here, his jetpack is fixed by a robot and he finds out that the receptionist at the fair is actually the leader of the future people. His name is David Nix or Governor Nix.

Fast-forward five decades and we meet Casey Newton, who is fond of space travel. She doesn’t want the launch center near her home to be destroyed. So every night she sabotages the destruction. She is caught by the police…

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Caricatures

ramblinginthecity:

The little one blogs too….

Originally posted on aadyaart:

We had a theme on caricatures in school. At home, I made caricatures of my family. I like Udai dada’s best! Mumma’s, papa’s and dadi’s are also nice.

IMG_1818 Udai is always lost in his books. His mind is filled with Tintin & Snowy, Harry Potter, Hermione and Ron, Artemis Fowl and the Wimpy Kid. I have tried to draw them here

IMG_1826 My papa is in the air all the time. He flies a plane called the Falcon 7X. He wears a funny uniform.

IMG_1820IMG_1822

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HOO=HOO THE LAKLE

ramblinginthecity:

Enter the fantasy world of theamazingUD….Lakles and Dormuks here we come!

Originally posted on theamazingud:

Lakles are interesting creatures. They have long arms and thin fingers. They have short, stubby feet, triangular bodies, big mouths, big eyes, small noses and no hair, except eyebrows. They grow up into a type of bird.

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There once was a young Lakle named HOO=HOO, laughing and tickling without reason, like all Lakles do. One morning, as HOO=HOO was walking along laughing and tickling without reason, he tickled one of his friend Superla and asked”Hee, Hee, Hee! Are you… Ha, Ha, Ha… coming to Balluch’s… Hoo, Hoo, Hoo… home to see him… Ha, Ha, Ha… perform?” As you can see, the Lakles did not have good communication skills.

Balluch was the last of the Dormuk birds in the city of Ha. The Dormuk birds are the birds that the Lakles grow into. The Dormuks laugh, but not as much as the Lakles. They lead the Lakles as they are not…

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An Indian alternative to the New York Times’ all-white summer reading list

ramblinginthecity:

Reblogging this ‘Indian’ reading list to have a true record and for all my blogger who love books as well. Proud to see names I’ve admired and loved for a long time as well as some new ones to explore soon….

Originally posted on Quartz:

The New York Times’ literary critic Janet Maslin recently published her list of must-read summer books, one that might well be her very last before she leaves her long-held full time role in July.

As Gawker points out, Maslin’s list this year manages to be made up entirely of white authors. And that’s part of a grand tradition—her New York Times’ must-read summer lists are usually pretty monochromatic: In 2012, of the 21 books chosen that summer, the only non-white author was Mindy Kaling. The following year the non-white world was represented by Kevin Kwan alone with Crazy Rich Asians. The list in 2014 acknowledged two non-white authors among a list of 17 titles. This year it has given up its egalitarian ghost altogether.

So here’s a Quartz India alternative—an all-Indian list of titles that are mostly recent releases, or soon-to-be-published, that we’re looking forward to reading this summer:

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