Category Archives: Uncategorized


Originally posted on Urban Design Collective:

Film city tower_main graphic

archasm invites architects, students, engineers, designers, artists and philosophers to send in their entries for our competition.
Idea based competition
Single stage competition
Team of maximum three members
No professional qualification necessary for eligibility
Teams can be interdisciplinary

Mumbai, or erstwhile Bombay is the largest metropolis of India and an answer to the likes of Shanghai, London or New York. It is the financial capital and trade epicentre of the country, a city of lifestyles and narratives. The ‘Maximum City’ of Bombay is renowned all over the globe for the enormity and surrealism of BOLLYWOOD, which is the nickname given to the Hindi language Film Industry located in the city. The industry has come a long way and bloomed since its inception, to a multi-billion dollar industry, only second in capacity to its American cousin, Hollywood. Bollywood is a goliath in terms of revenue generation and employment, both direct and…

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Congratulations winners! #TheCityasMuse

I’m absolutely delighted to announce the winners of #TheCityasMuse contest. The idea of the contest was to provide a space to express the feelings that we all have for the cities we experience or imagine. All the entries were great efforts at writing and illustrating cities. I played a minuscule rule in judging entries, but the judges were unanimous in selecting the pieces that deserved more credit than others. So without further ado….. here goes!


[Prize: Amazon gift coupon worth $100, hard copy of The Heat and Dust Project by Devapriya Roy and Sourav Jha + entry shared as guest post on Rambling in the City]

Rohan Patankar for Notes from B.Town, text and illustrations


[Prizes, each: Amazon gift coupon worth $30, hard copy of The Heat and Dust Project by Devapriya Roy and Sourav Jha + entry shared as guest post on Rambling in the City]

Ramesh K for Bohemian in Bangalore, poetry inspired by Ogden Nash

Divya Agrawal for her untitled entry on Jaipur, text and illustrations

Vitasta Raina for Karol Bagh, poetry

Rikhia Pal for A World-Map folded into several layers- Travelogue of the Point I reached, prose


[Will feature as guest post on Rambling in the City]

Nupur Chaturvedi for Gurgaon, poetry

Ashmi Ahluwalia for her untitled piece of fiction

Devaansh Singh for his untitled fantasy piece

Antara Choudhury for My City, prose

Shweta Sinha for A city fit for Royals, prose

Dear winners, I will be reaching out to you via email to share some feedback and ask for your mailing address in the case of the 5 who get the book. Your prizes will get to you soon.

Dear readers, I hope you enjoy the winning entries. Look forward to your comments and feedback.

FIELD URBANISM [a book review + recommendation]


Really interesting. We need newer ways to think about cities and this seems to be a good way to begin…

Originally posted on {FAVEL issues}:

All (urban) fields are (urban) fabrics but not all (urban) fabrics are (urban) fields.

For this post I want to talk about a fascinating book that just came out, Changing Chinese Cities: The Potentials of Field Urbanism. The author, Renee Chow, is not only a Prof. of Architecture at UC Berkeley and Principle at StudioUrbis, but she was my supervisor while I did my graduate studies at Berkeley, and continues to be a mentor and friend. Aside from having a personal relationship with the author and the research done, I have to say, in the most objective way I can, that this book is full of thoughtful analysis, reflecting a new understanding of the potentials of urban fabrics, and more particularly of field urbanisms.

field urbanisms

The book offers case studies, essays, and design explorations (illustrations and diagrams) of Chinese cities to demonstrate how field urbanism can identify the…

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Karachi: The City That Was – 1


More inspiration for those who are still struggling to pen their thoughts for #TheCityasMuse contest! Nostalgia and Karachi….

Originally posted on TheSouthAsianIdea Weblog:

By Ahmed Kamran

Yeh laash-e be-kafan Asad-e khasta jaan ki hai
Haq maghfarat kare ajab azad mard tha! (Ghalib)

If Karachi could be likened to a man, with a little liberty taken from Ghalib, this couplet could be a very appropriate epitaph for the tombstone of Karachi, the city that was! This is a series of some musings on the social and cultural aspects of the history of Karachi; how the city’s life was developed and transformed over time. It focuses on the period of 1960s and 1970s when I was young and had many dreams. What was the Karachi that my generation had inherited and what it is today? These writings have a clear ring of nostalgia. Paul Getty said, ‘Nostalgia often leads to idle speculation’. Indeed, nostalgia is distractive, breeds inaction, and, often, depression. But like some sweet-bitter memory of childhood or a sad song or a symphony…

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The life and times of a b**g*r


Of all Udai’s writings, I’ve enjoyed this the most. He really wanted to write about b**g*rs!!

Originally posted on theamazingud:

I was born in somebody’s nostrils. A dark, damp place filled with our homes. When I slept I dreamt of light. I thought that my home was peaceful and I would live forever in this place.

But the next day I saw the monstrous thing. It picked up my brother. ‘It’s going to eat him up’, I thought. It flicked my brother on to the carpet. ‘How rude!’ I thought. I found that this monstrous thing or ‘the finger’ won’t leave us alone.

One day I woke up to find myself in the gutter. I stayed there for weeks and weeks. I was saved by water missiles that poured down from the skies. Next day ice and water missiles rained from the skies. I saw a massive strangely shaped giant running. Those missiles must be deadly for him to be in such a hurry.

After some months, the…

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My Ramzan food journey to Matiah Mahal, Jama Masjid


Udai pens down his recent gastronomical journey to Matia Mahal during Ramzan…. Enjoy and yes, your mouth will water!

Originally posted on theamazingud:

Ramzan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. In this month, every able-bodied man, woman and teenager is supposed to fast. From dawn to sunset nothing is allowed to touch their tongues. After seeing the moon and doing Namaz they can eat whatever they want till sunrise.

A few weeks ago, I went to Old Delhi to try all the various delicacies made during Ramzan. I went by metro with my father’s friend Ruzeveh. The metro was very, very crowded. My father was waiting for me when I got to the Chowri Bazaar metro station. We walked till Jama Masjid and after some time entered Matiah Mahal.

We had seekh kebabs and beef boti at Lalu Kebabee; brain curry, tandoori roti and Nihari at Haji Shabrati; biryani at Tofiq Biryani; mango ice-cream, and kesar milk and Firni  at a shop opposite Karim’s. We drank lassi at Khabo Lassi too. I liked…

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Changing gears: Can the open defecation conversation move beyond subliminal patriarchal messaging?


My co-authored post with Kimberly Noronha on how we need to talk about the ‘real’ stuff when it comes to toilets and open defecation! being stuck at women’s honour has worked only in conjunction with ground level effort. It’s time to change the conversation

Originally posted on CPR Urban blog:

By Mukta Naik and Kimberly Noronha, both Senior Researchers at CPR

In today’s fast paced, slogan-driven policy environment, the pressure by the political masters (and indeed, the polity) on the bureaucracy to deliver on promises is enormous. The Prime Minister’s declaration of a “Swachh Bharat” by October 2019, complete with the status of an Open-Defecation Free (ODF) India is a commendable goal. But in a scenario of tight deadlines, the temptation is to pluck low hanging fruit, which in this case is women’s dignity and honour.

niti ayog Photo: Creative Commons License

We live in a patriarchal society; we don’t have to like it, but that is a fact. Patriarchal values are structured around women’s position and identity in society relative to men – largely linked to control over women’s sexuality. The protection of women’s dignity is linked to the honour of the household in particular, and the community at large under…

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To localise and humanise India’s urban project


Hard hitting!

Originally posted on Resources Research:

Cities and towns have outdated and inadequate master plans that are unable to address the needs of inhabitants. Photo: Rahul Goswami (2013) Cities and towns have outdated and inadequate master plans that are unable to address the needs of inhabitants. Photo: Rahul Goswami (2013)

The occasional journal Agenda (published by the Centre for Communication and Development Studies) has focused on the subject of urban poverty. A collection of articles brings out the connections between population growth, the governance of cities and urban areas, the sub-populations of the ‘poor’ and how they are identified, the responses of the state to urbanisation and urban residents (links at the end of this post).

My contribution to this issue has described how the urbanisation of India project is being executed in the name of the ‘urban poor’. But the urban poor themselves are lost in the debate over methodologies to identify and classify them and the thicket of entitlements, provisions and agencies to facilitate their ‘inclusion’ and ‘empowerment’. I have divided my essay into…

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The Story of Tommorowland (spoiler alert)


What started as a review but ended up more like a narration….

Originally posted on theamazingud:

If you want to watch the movie, this gives away the story.

wordpress blog photo

The story starts with a young boy named Frank Walker, at a fair trying to win $50 by making a jet pack. The jet pack doesn’t work as well as he wants it to. There he meets a girl named Athena who gives him a pin and asks him to follow her, but to do it discreetly. He eventually reaches a futuristic place named Tommorowland. Here, his jetpack is fixed by a robot and he finds out that the receptionist at the fair is actually the leader of the future people. His name is David Nix or Governor Nix.

Fast-forward five decades and we meet Casey Newton, who is fond of space travel. She doesn’t want the launch center near her home to be destroyed. So every night she sabotages the destruction. She is caught by the police…

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The little one blogs too….

Originally posted on aadyaart:

We had a theme on caricatures in school. At home, I made caricatures of my family. I like Udai dada’s best! Mumma’s, papa’s and dadi’s are also nice.

IMG_1818 Udai is always lost in his books. His mind is filled with Tintin & Snowy, Harry Potter, Hermione and Ron, Artemis Fowl and the Wimpy Kid. I have tried to draw them here

IMG_1826 My papa is in the air all the time. He flies a plane called the Falcon 7X. He wears a funny uniform.


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