Category Archives: Uncategorized

Changing gears: Can the open defecation conversation move beyond subliminal patriarchal messaging?

ramblinginthecity:

My co-authored post with Kimberly Noronha on how we need to talk about the ‘real’ stuff when it comes to toilets and open defecation! being stuck at women’s honour has worked only in conjunction with ground level effort. It’s time to change the conversation

Originally posted on cprurban:

By Mukta Naik and Kimberly Noronha, both Senior Researchers at CPR

In today’s fast paced, slogan-driven policy environment, the pressure by the political masters (and indeed, the polity) on the bureaucracy to deliver on promises is enormous. The Prime Minister’s declaration of a “Swachh Bharat” by October 2019, complete with the status of an Open-Defecation Free (ODF) India is a commendable goal. But in a scenario of tight deadlines, the temptation is to pluck low hanging fruit, which in this case is women’s dignity and honour.

niti ayog Photo: Creative Commons License

We live in a patriarchal society; we don’t have to like it, but that is a fact. Patriarchal values are structured around women’s position and identity in society relative to men – largely linked to control over women’s sexuality. The protection of women’s dignity is linked to the honour of the household in particular, and the community at large under…

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To localise and humanise India’s urban project

ramblinginthecity:

Hard hitting!

Originally posted on Resources Research:

Cities and towns have outdated and inadequate master plans that are unable to address the needs of inhabitants. Photo: Rahul Goswami (2013) Cities and towns have outdated and inadequate master plans that are unable to address the needs of inhabitants. Photo: Rahul Goswami (2013)

The occasional journal Agenda (published by the Centre for Communication and Development Studies) has focused on the subject of urban poverty. A collection of articles brings out the connections between population growth, the governance of cities and urban areas, the sub-populations of the ‘poor’ and how they are identified, the responses of the state to urbanisation and urban residents (links at the end of this post).

My contribution to this issue has described how the urbanisation of India project is being executed in the name of the ‘urban poor’. But the urban poor themselves are lost in the debate over methodologies to identify and classify them and the thicket of entitlements, provisions and agencies to facilitate their ‘inclusion’ and ‘empowerment’. I have divided my essay into…

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The Story of Tommorowland (spoiler alert)

ramblinginthecity:

What started as a review but ended up more like a narration….

Originally posted on theamazingud:

If you want to watch the movie, this gives away the story.

wordpress blog photo

The story starts with a young boy named Frank Walker, at a fair trying to win $50 by making a jet pack. The jet pack doesn’t work as well as he wants it to. There he meets a girl named Athena who gives him a pin and asks him to follow her, but to do it discreetly. He eventually reaches a futuristic place named Tommorowland. Here, his jetpack is fixed by a robot and he finds out that the receptionist at the fair is actually the leader of the future people. His name is David Nix or Governor Nix.

Fast-forward five decades and we meet Casey Newton, who is fond of space travel. She doesn’t want the launch center near her home to be destroyed. So every night she sabotages the destruction. She is caught by the police…

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Caricatures

ramblinginthecity:

The little one blogs too….

Originally posted on aadyaart:

We had a theme on caricatures in school. At home, I made caricatures of my family. I like Udai dada’s best! Mumma’s, papa’s and dadi’s are also nice.

IMG_1818 Udai is always lost in his books. His mind is filled with Tintin & Snowy, Harry Potter, Hermione and Ron, Artemis Fowl and the Wimpy Kid. I have tried to draw them here

IMG_1826 My papa is in the air all the time. He flies a plane called the Falcon 7X. He wears a funny uniform.

IMG_1820IMG_1822

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HOO=HOO THE LAKLE

ramblinginthecity:

Enter the fantasy world of theamazingUD….Lakles and Dormuks here we come!

Originally posted on theamazingud:

Lakles are interesting creatures. They have long arms and thin fingers. They have short, stubby feet, triangular bodies, big mouths, big eyes, small noses and no hair, except eyebrows. They grow up into a type of bird.

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There once was a young Lakle named HOO=HOO, laughing and tickling without reason, like all Lakles do. One morning, as HOO=HOO was walking along laughing and tickling without reason, he tickled one of his friend Superla and asked”Hee, Hee, Hee! Are you… Ha, Ha, Ha… coming to Balluch’s… Hoo, Hoo, Hoo… home to see him… Ha, Ha, Ha… perform?” As you can see, the Lakles did not have good communication skills.

Balluch was the last of the Dormuk birds in the city of Ha. The Dormuk birds are the birds that the Lakles grow into. The Dormuks laugh, but not as much as the Lakles. They lead the Lakles as they are not…

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An Indian alternative to the New York Times’ all-white summer reading list

ramblinginthecity:

Reblogging this ‘Indian’ reading list to have a true record and for all my blogger who love books as well. Proud to see names I’ve admired and loved for a long time as well as some new ones to explore soon….

Originally posted on Quartz:

The New York Times’ literary critic Janet Maslin recently published her list of must-read summer books, one that might well be her very last before she leaves her long-held full time role in July.

As Gawker points out, Maslin’s list this year manages to be made up entirely of white authors. And that’s part of a grand tradition—her New York Times’ must-read summer lists are usually pretty monochromatic: In 2012, of the 21 books chosen that summer, the only non-white author was Mindy Kaling. The following year the non-white world was represented by Kevin Kwan alone with Crazy Rich Asians. The list in 2014 acknowledged two non-white authors among a list of 17 titles. This year it has given up its egalitarian ghost altogether.

So here’s a Quartz India alternative—an all-Indian list of titles that are mostly recent releases, or soon-to-be-published, that we’re looking forward to reading this summer:

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Gentrification causes homelessness? Simplistically linking problems does not translate to good housing policy

Originally posted on cprurban:

by Mukta Naik

Scholars, bloggers and journalists in the Global North, especially in the UK and the US, have drawn clear links between the process of gentrification and the increase in homelessness since the early 2000s. With the problem of homelessness growing steadily—some 60,000 people in New York sleep in shelters each night as per the Coalition for the Homeless, about 6,500 slept on London’s streets in 2013-24, 70% more than the number in 2010 as per local agencies—quite a bit of passionate soul searching has taken place over its causes. It has seemed logical to pin the blame on the gentrification of erstwhile poor, debilitated areas of the city. Global capital and the greed of investors, sometimes from far overseas, and even the idea of the global city have been named the villains. In short, global capital (the rich) has pushed out local capital (the middle class and the…

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NITI Ayog & CPR seminar: “Open Defecation Free (ODF) Communities: A key step towards Swachh Bharat”

ramblinginthecity:

Do attend if you can

Originally posted on cprurban:

Swachh Bharat Abhiyan (SBA), India’s national-level mission on sanitation was arguably born from the realisation that open defecation figures in India remain high in both rural and urban areas. A large push to  construct individual household latrines, and convert insanitary (including pit latrines) into sanitary latrines is underway and the target is for India to be Open Defecation Free (ODF) by 2019.

NITI Ayog, the Government of India’s policy think tank and Centre for Policy Research partner to put the spotlight on this issue, which lies at the core of the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan’s success. The seminar titled “Open Defecation Free (ODF) Communities: A key step towards Swachh Bharat” will debate the definition of ODF communities and the evolution of a suitable matrix to measure the achievement of this status under the mission.

Seminar: Open Defecation Free (ODF) Communities: A key step towards Swachh Bharat

Date: Friday, 22 May 2015
Time: 3:00…

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The story of gentrification of a local market

ramblinginthecity:

A friend wrote the post I’ve wanted to write forever. Cities never fail to amaze and surprise, and Delhi is special that way…

Originally posted on Rural-Urban Frontiers:

Twenty years ago when I lived in Delhi I drove past Meherchand Market without giving it a second look as it was never a destination. It was simply a row of small shops, tailors and mechanics which catered to Lodi Colony residents. Lodi Colony was a run down low-income neighbourhood which housed those working in the nearby posh central Delhi locales of Khan Market, Jorbagh and Golflinks. I was surprised to find Meherchand Market now being widely reported as Delhi’s upcoming retail spaces catering to the high fashion industry and elite. Delhi’s “developing” urban fabric, its ever expanding metro network, numerous flyovers (being built supposedly to ease the traffic), the revamped airport have transformed the city, but all these did not surprise me half as much as what I saw the other day while driving past Meherchand Market. The humble shopping street which had held out for so long has gentrified into a posh upmarket street. Being located close to Khan Market, which attract Asia’s highest…

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Failure in planning OR failure of planning? Reflections on the saga of Mumbai’s DP

ramblinginthecity:

Some concrete suggestions for planners in the context of Mumbai’s recently shelved (but soon to re-appear) DP!

Originally posted on cprurban:

The ambitious Mumbai Development Plan (DP) 2034, envisaged as a blueprint that specifies the land allocations, land use patterns, transportation networks and amenities for India’s largest metropolis, has been recently put on the shelf  for revisions following intense criticism on several fronts. It is to be revised and republished for public response within four months.

gateway of india Iconic monument, Mumbai’s Gateway of India. Photo credits: Mukta Naik

The release of the plan into the public domain, itself a unique occurrence for Indian city planning, has facilitated an unprecedented amount of public debate and discussion. In the process, many hitherto unconcerned citizens have hopefully thought about the issues involved in deciding a future for their city. However, several burning questions remain. On the mechanics of planning a megacity like Mumbai. On the processes and institutions required. On responsibility. On why Indian cities are unable to plan. And on why they must learn to…

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